image

That which is essential is non-impositional, but there is no end to the demands of what is non essential. – James Finley from Transforming Trauma

He’s speaking here in terms of doing spiritual work, of sitting with ourselves, of digging deeper into the issues that are rising up in our hearts and really giving ourselves the space to process and let it be. I think that perhaps he overstates the case here. His statement here sounds a little too generalized, because sometimes essential things do impose themselves – like young children who endlessly impose on their parents.

Still, in a general sense it isn’t a bad point, because what Finley is talking about is the depth of inner grace, what the Quakers call “the inner light,” those times when something rises up from a very genuine and authentic space within. When we find grace welling up within, it makes no demands of us. It is that which does not impose itself. For that reason we need to commit ourselves to it and make space for it, even if that means intentionally breaking with the herd. This is the path of the spiritual seeker: that whatever it is that is happening inside, it has to be a priority, she dare not ignore it. Whatever is happening is essential because it is speaking to something in her essence.

Note on photo: Taken on my recent <a href=" That which is essential is non-impositional, but there is no end to the demands of what is non essential. – James Finley from Transforming Trauma He’s speaking here in terms of doing spiritual work, of sitting with ourselves, of digging deeper into the issues that are rising up in our hearts and really giving ourselves the space to process and let it be. I think that perhaps he overstates the case here. His statement here sounds a little too generalized, because sometimes essential things do impose themselves – like young children who endlessly impose on their parents. Still, in a general sense it isn’t a bad point, because what Finley is talking about is the depth of inner grace, what the Quakers call “>trip through Alpine, Texas.

One thought on “Essential Path

  1. I support your nuanced interpretation, Erdman. If, while you were sitting in the place where you took this photo, a train started barreling toward you along that track, I’m guessing that you would find the train to be both essential and impositional. Coincidentally, I recently wrote a scene in which a Pilgrim falls asleep on a railroad track siding, awakening to discover a diesel engine looming above and behind him, idling on the track waiting for him to get up. “Look out! (Not in.)” — motto of the Salon Postisme.

    Like

Share your thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s