Stories & Life
Comment 1

Letters from inside a prison cell

A former student writes this from prison. Just a small reminder of how difficult it is for those who are incarcerated to survive, let alone improve their mental, psychological, and moral condition. I admire those who endure incarceration and still manage to grow and advance. They are exceptional and brilliant individuals.

“….we have been locked down for the last thirty days some one come up with the bright idea to escape. so the other 3100 of us got to reap his reward. that was some pretty tough time,though gave me time to do a moral and spiritual inventory of myself. wish i would have had a list of prison and jail rules of lock down and prisoners rights if any. they fed us every 14 or so hours and let us out every three days to shower for ten minutes other than that cell bound. almost literaly bread and water ,some cereal and peanut butter,and a hot meal every 7 days as long as they didnt run out…..”

One very important thing you could do for humanity and society is to simply write an inmate. If you do not already do so, I’d recommend giving it a try. It is easy and doesn’t require much of a time commitment, but it is an incredibly profound correspondence.

This entry was posted in: Stories & Life

by

Writer. In the summers, I live and work in the incredible state of Alaska, in the bush community of McCarthy, as the Executive Director of the Wrangell Mountain Center. When not in McCarthy, you'll typically find me in the Santa Cruz Mountains of California, writing and working with local activists. My primary writing project right now is a novel set in remote bush Alaska, of the magical realism genre wherein an earnest and independent young woman finds a mysterious radio belonging to her grandmother, a device that has paranormal bandwidth and a disturbing ability to mess with one's mental stability.

1 Comment

  1. Joy Erdman says

    So right, Jon! It makes them feel so special to get mail. They read the letters over and over. It’s a connection to the outside world, it means somebody cares and it’s something new to think about in the long hours ahead.

    Like

Consider this post an invitation, an invitation to comment and collaborate ~ In Solidarity, JE

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