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It isn’t a secret that the Bible is anti-gay. This basically makes no sense, on the surface. I have had a theory over the years that the anti-gay language goes back to the attempt of ancient cultures to strictly maintain male hierarchies of control.

By and large, this theory fits the biblical evidence as I see it. Mainstream American Christians, for example, tend to believe that the Bible prohibits homosexuality because it is “sinful” or “evil” — they see it as a moral problem. But the Bible never actually says that. The ancient law of Moses basically says: gay sex is detestable, kill them both by stoning them to death. End of story. There’s no “pray the gay away” camps or anything. A man is not to lie with a man “as a man lies with a woman” because women are to be sexually submissive. When a man is in the submissive position, that violates the natural order of the hierarchy. The answer is just to stone them and move on.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m glad that modern day Christians are not calling on the death penalty to deal with homosexuality. Though, to be fair, there are Christians who do call for gay people to be killed, and in other countries, gay people are still murdered, jailed, or maimed as a matter of law — I don’t mean to diminish this very real persecution. My point is simply that if my theory is correct, then most modern American Christians don’t really understand the roots of why there is so much anti-gay language in the Bible. If they did, they might be willing to rethink.

All that brings me to what I learned today. I was listening to one of those Great Courses series. This one on Classical Mythology. The Professor explained that in ancient Athenian culture, sexuality was based on the hierarchy of domination and control. To put it bluntly, it was all about who penetrated who. Man penetrating woman = okay. Male god penetrating human female = okay. Human male penetrating female goddess…not so okay.

Homosexuality was okay, as long as it maintained the hierarchy. So, a mature, older man could penetrate an adolescent male, because the hierarchy is not violated.

This adds a bit more substance to my theory that the biblical anti-gay rhetoric is rooted in the hierarchy of male control and domination. This would be a reason to dispense not only with Christian anti-gay rhetoric but to also consider all of the ways in which Christianity needs to question hierarchies of domination and control.

That’s what I learned today.

2 thoughts on “I learned something interesting today

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