All posts tagged: Socialism & Capitalism

2019 POV

For me, 2019 brought a big shift. In the fall of 2018 I knew that I needed to make a change. I had resigned my management position at McCarthy Lodge, at the end of the summer season, but it wasn’t quite clear what I should do next. Should I look for another seasonal summer Alaskan gig? Or should I look to do something else entirely? Was I going to continue to live my nomadic lifestyle, spending summers in Alaska and winters in California? To complicate matters, my health had suddenly taken a bad turn, back in the fall of 2018, and problems in my gut had led to me losing a great deal of weight (which was alarming because I’m already a skinny dude). I was feeling extremely low energy, to the point where a simple, short walk just about did me in for the day. At that point, all options were on the table.

Ocasio-Cortez: ‘Capitalism is irredeemable’ | TheHill

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) on Saturday called capitalism “irredeemable.” “Capitalism is an ideology of capital – the most important thing is the concentration of capital and to seek and maximize profit,” she said during an interview at the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas, according to Bloomberg News. “To me, capitalism is irredeemable,” she added, arguing that capitalism’s goals come at a cost to people and the environment, Bloomberg reported.

NYC: Amazon is out, class consciousness is in

The Powers That Be In NYC Be not happy With AOC They keep going after her, which is quite remarkable, really, i.e., that a freshman Congressional representative would get this much national attention. There is understandable great consternation and anxiety on the political right about America’s re-awakening and rising sense of class consciousness. Class consciousness seems to be only increasing, which means that in the future Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez can expect a lot more intense opposition and hostility than billboards in Times Square.

“America will never be a socialist country”

Per Fox News, President Trump dramatically vowed during his State of the Union address on Tuesday that “America will never be a socialist country,” in an apparent rebuke to self-described Democratic socialist Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Bernie Sanders that drew loud cheers and a standing ovation from Republicans in the House chamber — as well as supportive applause from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Ocasio-Cortez had the perfect zinger of a response, as usual: “I thought it was great. I think he’s scared.” I think it’s great too. I was pretty stoked when I heard that Trump bashed socialism, with the eyes of the nation upon him. Having our tempestuous Tweeter in Chief condemn socialism in the State of the Union Address is the kind of exposure you just can’t buy, which is something that a promotional genius like Trump should be able to appreciate, which of course begs the question: Is Trump, himself, a Socialist? Is he using his plummeting popularity to drive people to socialism?

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: The Ice Cream Socialist

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. To me AOC seems like a breath of fresh air. Of course it might just be my own thing, because I’m still somewhat stunned at the fact that democratic socialists are actually in mainstream politics now. That’s just seems incredibly surreal, despite the fact that it’s at least a half century overdue.

Women’s March 2019

Activism is good for the soul. I want to change the world, like anyone else, but for me activism is also extremely therapeutic. It reminds me that there are other people who see injustices in the world and believe in their bones that things don’t have to be this way. That’s especially true of big activist events like the Women’s March. It’s kind of a beautiful thing, to be surrounded by smiling faces and to snap a hundred pictures of the explosion in creativity that surrounds us: all the catchy and colorful signs, the carefully crafted costumes, the music, the chanting, and the chalk art on the streets. Yet in the midst of this exhilarating experience of solidarity, opposition and hostility can sometimes come from unexpected places and from unexpected people.